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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 25, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the government prepares to put its plan for brexit before the commons. yesterday, judges ruled that mps should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. it's thought a bill could now be introduced as early as tomorrow. ministers are urging members of parliament not use that bill as a chance to frustrate or delay the process, but critics, including some conservatives, are putting theresa may under pressure to give them even more of a say on exactly what kind of brexit she delivers. good morning, it's wednesday 25th january. also this morning: president trump promises a big day ahead on national security, including an announcement about his plans for a wall on the mexican border. in business, can a company impose a dress code for staff? from high heels to short skirts, two parliamentary reports say no.
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firms must not and can not tell workers what to wear. johanna konta has been knocked out the australian open. she lost her quarter—final to serena williams 6—2 6—3 in just over an hour in melbourne. she was the last brit left in the competition. also this morning: we'll be hearing a toy story with a difference. which one's yours? i would say this is lego, this is not. ok, this is lego? this is lego. we'll find out how one of the world's best known brands is counting the cost of counterfeits in china. and carol has the weather. good morning. once again today with starting off with some patchy freezing fog and it is particularly dense across parts of the south. it's also slippery underfoot so take
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extra ca re. it's also slippery underfoot so take extra care. there will be some sunshine around today, also some drizzle and strong winds in the north—west. i'll put all that together in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. mps have stepped up demands for the government to publish its plan for brexit in a formal policy document. the demands for a white paper, including from some conservatives, follows yesterday's supreme court ruling. theresa may must give parliament a vote before triggering article 50, the formal process for leaving to the eu. it's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. after thejudges ruled only parliament could start brexit, today a warning for mps — don't to try to derail the plan. the supreme courtjudgement means a bill on triggering article 50, the start of britain's exit process, must be put before mps and lords. so what lies on the road ahead? the government says legislation paving the way for brexit will be tabled within days — that will be voted on by both
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houses of parliament. theresa may wants article 50 triggered by the end of march, then britain has two years to leave the eu. so there can be no going back. the point of no return was passed injune 23, last year. labour say they won't block article 50 but want to amend the bill, to give mps more control of the process. if necessary, there will be hand—to—hand combat on this. we need to make sure that we get the best deal on behalf the whole country and she can't say she acts on behalf the whole country. theresa may also faces opposition from some of her own mps, who wanta formal exit document to be debated. but for now, at least, ministers believe they are on track to get brexit triggered by the spring. tom bateman, bbc news our political correspondent carol walker is outside the houses of parliament, how extensive will the tory rebellion be? we're hearing in tom's piece about
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the tory rebellion. it looks as though a number of tories rebelling against the government will be quite small but the question is whether all the different opponents to parts of the government's approach to this will be able to coalesce to impose defeats on the government. we're going to get a build tomorrow from the government which will be a pretty short bill essentially asking parliament to approve the negotiating process. we know for example labour are going to amend that so if we don't like the bill that so if we don't like the bill that we get the prime minister will be forced to go back and negotiate more. we know the liberal democrats are demanding a second referendum on any final grexit deal and we know the snp are saying scotland should be allowed to remain in the european
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single market —— brexit. what they all agree on is they want more detail to be set out in something called a white paper, a formal proposal of government plans but the government could simply agree to that. underlying this at the moment is the government being confident that they will still be able to stick to its timetable and begin those formal brexit negotiations by the end of march. thank you, carol. plenty more from the houses of parliament later in the morning. we'll be speaking to businesswoman gina miller, who took the case to the supreme court, just after 8am this morning. president trump has said a big day is planned on national security today, including an announcement on building a wall on the us border with mexico, one of his main campaign pledges. in a message on twitter, he also said to expect many other things. reports from washington say he will sign several executive orders relating to immigration and border security over the coming days. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. we're going to have our border is
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nice and strong, we're going to build a wall. it was the soundtrack to donald trump's unorthodox campaignfor to donald trump's unorthodox campaign for president, a call to build a wall along america's southern border with mexico. now he seems set to press ahead with measures he believes are vital to stemming the illegal flow of immigrants into the united states. the president on his twitter account said simply: he's vowed to make mexico pay for it. but the mexican government has refused to do so. later in the week, to round off a busy start to his presidency, mr trump is expected to sign executive orders, closing america's borders to refugees and limiting access to citizens from seven african and middle eastern countries, countries the administration believes export terrorism. they're mainly muslim countries but the mantra of the trump
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administration is america first. a country that traditionally has opened its doors to immigrants is about to head in the opposite direction. david willis, bbc news, washington. women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes to dress codes at work according to a parliamentary report. mps heard from hundreds of women who reported that the dress codes they were subject to were sexist. they began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. what to wear at work? sometimes there's no choice, and it is not always attractive. but what about being ordered to wear high heels? when nicola thorpe arrived for her first day at work, she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes with a two to four inch heel. when she refused, she was sent home without pay. what they state is it gives them a more professional look. a corporate, professional look. i'm not entirely sure why adding two
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or four inches to my height makes me more professional, or makes me walk in a professional manner. i don't think it affects how i come across. you can see me now, this is exactly what i would be wearing. and if it's just a matter of a couple of inches, i can stand tall without wearing heels. she then started a petition, which led to an inquiry by mps, who now want action from the government. we've come up with three recommendations. firstly, that the equalities act of 2010 obviously isn't addressing that bit. secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make—up may be a health and safety issue in the workplace. and thirdly, we are going to hopefully... if it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court. there will be tribunals. at this company, receptionists can wear what they like. in its evidence, the government said the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed on nicola was unlawful. but the mps are calling on the government to do more to make the law more effective in protecting employees
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from discrimination at work. emma simpson, bbc news. the screening age for bowel cancer in england, wales and northern ireland should be reduced to 50 years old, according to the charity beating bowel cancer. scotland is the only part of the uk which screens from 50. the charity says that if other parts of the uk came into line, 4,000 patients a year would have the opportunity to be diagnosed earlier. a delayed upgrade to the radio system used by the emergency services in england, scotland and wales may cost taxpayers £475 million a year. mps on the public accounts committee say the planned new system isn't used by any other country, and needs to be properly tested to make sure it works under pressure. fiona lamdin reports. the 105 police, fire and ambulance services in england, scotland and
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wales communicate using a radio network known as airwave. but these contracts expire in two years time. in its pies the emergency service network, and adapted smart phone system network, and adapted smart phone syste m ru n network, and adapted smart phone system run by ag, on ee. its hope they'll be able to help the emergency services streamed live video, relayed patient data and access blueprints for buildings. but the public accounts committee is calling on ministers to address what they see as real security concerns. our real concern about the new system is at the moment at the time we had our hearing there was no deal struck, there still isn't, about transport for london and the london underground and there are questions about other underg rounds in underground and there are questions about other undergrounds in the country. if it doesn't work underground then it's a real risk for our people and our emergency services who need to contact each other in real time in case of an emergency like 77. on top of this it probably would be ready in time so the old airwave network may have to
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be extended at an annual cost of £a75 million, which the public accou nts £a75 million, which the public accounts committee says the home office hasn't budgeted for. in a statement the home office said: when it is up and running the uk will be the first in the world to replace their front—line radios with what effectively is an adapted smart phone. fiona lamdin, bbc news. david cameron has been appointed president of alzheimer's research uk. in an article in the times he says research into cancer and strokes deserve all their funding, but that dementia shouldn't be so far behind. his new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing down as an mp. an rnli lifeboat station in yorkshire has a new crew member, basil the fox. the wild animal has befriended the team and has become a regular
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visitor to the station. they say he's nearly as tame as a pet dog, and as you can see, he certainly isn't camera shy. normally they run away! it does look like he's incredibly relaxed and calm. i wasjust wanting to tell you a story... i've trod in a fox poo this week, i probably shouldn't have told you that! the smell is horrendous. we have one that keeps jumping over the fences. the ones in the back garden and he terrifies our little dog. i was taking the kids' bikes to the shed and i've trod in the poo in the slivers! maybe i shouldn't have mentioned it! at least it wasn't barefoot! imagine! i've done that before. hosed those suckers down! u2 are
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really bringing up the tone this morning! i'm just really bringing up the tone this morning! i'mjust searching really bringing up the tone this morning! i'm just searching for a real treat i'm going to bring you in a moment from the papers. that's a promise! we start with news overnight australia. not brilliant news. jana konta is out of the australian open but what a transformation over the last year or so. “— transformation over the last year or so. —— johanna konta. transformation over the last year or so. ——johanna konta. she's changed her approach to matches, she's changed her mental attitude, she doesn't panic and she keeps really calm on court. it shows you how disappointed we are not going further. when you think about who she played and what she did today was such an achievement. johanna konta has been knocked out of the australian open this morning. she lost her quarter—final to serena williams 6—2 6—3 in just over an hour in melbourne. she was the last brit left in the competition. williams will play lucic—barroni in the semi—final.
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former olympic champion nicole cooke says british cycling is run by men for men and its attempts to stop doping are inadequate and ineffective. cooke made the claims in written evidence submitted to a culture, media and sport select committee yesterday. manchester united are making progress underjose mourinho and are unlucky not to be challenging chelsea, according to their former boss sir alex ferguson. ferguson told the bbc he believes mourinho has got to grips with the club. we will show that interview later this morning. and british five—time olympianjo pavey is to run in this year's london marathon. the a3—year—old says she hopes to use the race to qualify for the world championships in august. i have to say i'm incredibly lucky, idid i have to say i'm incredibly lucky, i did once go for a run with dzhokhar tsarnaev. film slightly kindly for me. —— withjo. —— filmed. she happily hopped along.
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fantastic. good luck to her. a little look at the papers. i was attracted to the daily telegraph this morning because it has nice colours on the front page. there can be no turning back is the main story. the scottish national party, the liberal democrats and labour commenting on brexit in a lovely colour scheme of the fun of the daily telegraph. i know it is important, but it attracted my eye. the front of the daily mail, the lady who brought the whole case to the supreme court, jean miller, we will speak to her later, and the daily mail looking at the implications of the court ruling yesterday. mps, they say they have a plot to thwart racks at. -- brexit. the daily mail, when will they learn? they say nothing has changed
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with drivers using the phone at the wheel. pictures hear of people holding their mobiles i think taking yesterday. the times as well talking about thejudgement yesterday. the times as well talking about the judgement at the supreme court. judges make history in brexit blow to ministers. who shall we start with? oh, sally. i love how you do that. sorry, louise, i am lowering the tone, i'm talking about lycra. you know i love lowering the tone, i'm talking about lycra. you know! love lycra. this is meant in lycra. several places in new zealand have banned men going into pubs and cafes wearing cycling shorts. quite right too. they are trying to raise address standards. they say that lots of customers don't need to know that much detail about someone because the shorts are too tight. unsightly. yes, unsightly, and it is really common, isn't it, men and women of all ages,
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shapes and sizes on their bike cycling. does it really matter? no, but it is strange, isn't it, when you go to work, and all of a sudden someone is cycling home and there they are in all of their glory. oh, hello! it is strange. i am standing up hello! it is strange. i am standing upfora hello! it is strange. i am standing up for a cyclist, there is only one way to ride a bike and it is in lycra. not when you are at the pub eating lunch. there is a list of things not to wear over as, fake tan, pom—pom hats, sweatpants — everything comfortable. fake tan. thinking of myself. shall i raise the tone? you can try. on the front of the business pages, this big story from bt in evolving their italian business. in itself not
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usually interesting in the uk but it is knocking 20% off the value of bt shares, that is £8 billion from the value of the firm, all related to accounting scandals. the italian unit was borrowing too much money, paying debts with borrowed money and hiding the fact it had borrowed that. they have ousted the management team in italy. there is pressure on gavin patterson, the uk boss, to work out if he can resolve it. £8 billion off the value of bt. how would you feel about an apple that would never turn brown? good. it is an gm apple... oh, i didn't know that. going on sale in america for the first time next month. created in canada, grown over ten yea rs created in canada, grown over ten years in washington state and british columbia and it comes pre— cut. pre- cut? it never discolours, it never turns brown. campaigners say it looks great but it doesn't
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say it looks great but it doesn't say gm on the packaging. what would be more useful in my house is bananas that don't go brown. some people love brown bananas. they are very good for blending and smoothies. thank you, everybody. goodness me, save us. is it cold ain? goodness me, save us. is it cold again? yes, for some of us, there is an18 again? yes, for some of us, there is an 18 degrees difference in temperature north and south at the moment, in the north—west highlands it is 13, in exeter it is —5. we also have freezing fog to watch out for, especially in southern and south—eastern parts of england. also in the midlands we have fog around the vale of york. it is slippery. if you are out and about, take care on the roads and pavements. it is windy to the west. we are looking at
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severe gales in the north—west with exposure. in the south—east we don't have that problem. we have all this fog, dance, poor visibility, have that problem. we have all this fog, dance, poorvisibility, not dissimilar to monday, and don't forget it is quite slippery as well —— dense. southwest england doesn't have that problem, nor in wales or across have that problem, nor in wales or a cross m ost have that problem, nor in wales or across most of northern england, some in the vale of york, and here we see some sunshine, but in scotla nd we see some sunshine, but in scotland there is patchy fog, cloud and a mild start for northern ireland. very varied weather this morning. through the morning what is happening is, as cloud comes in, it will make the fog lifted into low cloud, you can see sunshine ahead of it for southwest england, wales, northern england, whereas in scotla nd northern england, whereas in scotland we see breaks around murray firth, but the emphasis is on a lot of cloud with rain coming in on the wind. temperature—wise, mild in the west, still cold in the south,
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especially as cloud comes into the south—east through the afternoon. through this evening, less of an issue with the fog, but there is cloud around during the overnight period. it will be cold as we drag in this continental air. there will be some drizzle around, and some light snow as well, and watch out for us where it has been damp with temperatures below freezing, we are looking at a widespread frost. through the evening into tomorrow we have a cold, nagging south—easterly. it will feel quite more tomorrow. some drizzle, so the risk of ice where we have it, or some light snow, but not enough to build a snowman. they will be a lot of dry weather and around and sunshine. this is how it will feel against your skin. newcastle, this is how it will feel against yourskin. newcastle, one degree, it will feel more like —5. as we go into friday, cold wind coming in,
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mild in the south—west and a little less cold into central and eastern areas. so, the message is, wrap up warmly. i am very glad that i brought my big coach today. wise decision. ferry. a number of female mps have told the bbc that they've received physical and verbal threats, and fear for their safety following the death of the labour mpjo cox. in a survey by bbc radio 5 live, some said they'd also experienced sexist language in the commons, and even considered giving up theirjob. at a time when more women are being encouraged to go into politics, how off—putting is this? our political correspondent ellie price has been finding out. it wasn't easy getting women the vote. it took even longer to get women into parliament. the first female mp to take her seat, nancy astor, was elected 98 years ago. eventually, more would follow. astor, was elected 98 years ago. eventually, more would followm gives me the greatest pleasure to
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introduce to you the new national unionist women members. back then, of course, they didn't have social media, unlike the 195 female mps today. so, what you're looking at are the abusive tweets that my team screen shot it. and mclauchlan mp won't read the abuse she receives online. it isjust won't read the abuse she receives online. it is just as well, she doesn't want to share it. it takes a lot of strength not to. it is tempting if you are a loan at night and no one can see you if you get upset to just have a look. but why would i do that to myself? i have to say, i see the silver lining in not... the silver lining is i may never have to put up with that sort of abuse again in my life, because it doesn't happen unless you've got some kind of high profile and then
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people think they have carte blanche to call you whatever they want to call you. it isn'tjust hurtful insults on social media. there is an even darker side of death threats and violence. jo cox was murdered outside her constituency surgery lastjune. outside her constituency surgery last june. two thirds outside her constituency surgery lastjune. two thirds of female mps we spoke to say they have felt less safe ever since. well over half have received a physical threat from a member of the public. this is the room where i hold my surgeries. tulip sadik grudgingly makes sure she has security whenever she holds security surgeries. you feel safe now? this building has a police presence outside, staff are supportive, so i feel safer. it was one of my staff members who opened, quite young, i felt sorry for them, opening this letter that said they wa nted opening this letter that said they wanted to butcher my family. the offer scott in part with me and
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said, we need to take it to the police. i took swift action. the police. i took swift action. the police were quick to respond. it makes me think, who has time to sit and write a letter to an mp saying, i want to kill you and yourfamily? it all paints rather a grim picture and certainly the majority of mps we spoke to say they are concerned that hearing about this sort of abuse might put off good new people, good new women, from wanting to become mps. in fact a third of those we heard from zp have considered giving up heard from zp have considered giving up theirjob here in parliament because of it. and yet none of them have. and the majority we heard from say despite the difficulties, the job is a privilege, and well worth the flak. it is interesting that, isn't it? coming up this morning on breakfast: the copy—cat lego that's so good even the boss can't tell the difference. we have a special report on china's counterfeit market. and he was incredulous, wasn't he, when he was shown? this is the one,
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yeah. he couldn't believe it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. several businesses in wembley have been destroyed after a large fire gutted a building on an industrial estate. it began on monday evening but wasn't brought under control until tuesday afternoon. over 120 fire—fighters tackled the blaze. the cause is not yet known and an investigation has begun. an independent review over controversial plans to redevelop land around millwall's football stadium is to be held by lewisham council. if the development goes ahead, the club has suggested it could force them to leave the area. bbc london has seen a letter from the council's chief executive
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saying that the decision will be reviewed independently. a high court ruling has paved the way for the removal of a protest camp at leith hill in surrey. it had been set up in protest over europa's plans to site a test drilling well in the area of natural beauty. the company believes that a substantial reservoir of oil could exist beneath the surrey hills. campaigners worried about the environmental impact, have been fighting the application for the last eight years. it's expected that bailiffs will arrive to evict the protestors and demolish the camp within the next few days. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good news if you're using the tubes this morning, as all lines look like they're running well at the moment. on the trains, though, southeastern services still have various diversions in place following a train derailment yesterday. check their website for details. if we take a look at the roads now, this is trinity road in wandsworth. it's closed southbound between east hill and the a3 because of an incident. and victoria street in westminster is closed off in both directions because of a burst water main between broadway and buckingham gate. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella.
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good morning. it is another called and foggy start to the day, now the fog quite extensive and places, we didn't get it yesterday, so some thick freezing fog and it is cold, so the met office has issued a weather warning for the dense and potentially freezing fog and the ice risk as well. through the course of the morning we have cloud moving in through the continent. that will help either cloud. the air underneath the cloud much colder, it is going to feel very chilly this afternoon. the maximum temperature struggling between 1— four degrees. overnight tonight and other very cold one with widespread frost, temperatures dropping down. still a little bit of mist and fog but a bit more of a breeze helping to keep it moving. the minimum temperature between 0— —1 in towns and cities, soa between 0— —1 in towns and cities, so a very between 0— —1 in towns and cities, so a very cold day tomorrow with chilly airfrom the so a very cold day tomorrow with chilly air from the continent. on friday, similar conditions. through
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the weekend we have this area of low pressure which brings showers across through much of saturday. if you are looking for a better day of the two, sunday is the best bet for the moment, so for the next couple of days, for tomorrow, a very cold day, the act coming in from the continent, temperatures in single figures, two or three at best, chilly night on friday with some slightly less cold air as we head into the weekend. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: bowel cancer is the uk's second biggest cancer killer, but the age at which you're tested depends on where you live. in scotland it's at 50, and we'll hear about calls to bring the rest of the uk in line. they're the volunteer rescue workers saving lives in syria, and now a short film
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about their work has been nominated for an oscar. we'll find out more about the white helmets. and if you think you know your british history, then think again. historian lucy worsley will be here to separate fact from fiction, as she tackles the nation's biggest fibs. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: mps have stepped up demands for the government to publish its plan for brexit in a formal policy document. the demands for a white paper, including from some conservatives, follow yesterday's supreme court ruling that parliament must be given a vote. it's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow. our political correspondent carol walker is at westminster, how large could this tory rebellion be? what might the process be? of what we understand is tomorrow the government in parliament will
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introduce a bill. were told this will be a pretty short, straightforward bill that will essentially said parliament will approve the triggering of article 50 that begins the formal negotiating process “— that begins the formal negotiating process —— we're told. but the opposition parties and indeed some conservatives are going to use that process to try to amend the bill and put down the changes they want to see. labour are saying they think that there should be a vote at the end of the negotiations and if they don't like the deal, if the brussels deal is good enough, the prime minister should be forced to go back and renegotiate a better deal. theresa may has said if it's a bad deal she wants to be able to say we're better off having no deal at all. we know the snp are saying scotla nd all. we know the snp are saying scotland should be allowed to remain in the single market. they're threatening to have a second referendum on scottish independence if they don't get their way. and the liberal democrats are saying there should be a second referendum of the
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british people at the end of the two yea rs of british people at the end of the two years of negotiations, so lots of different agendas here but one thing on which they could all coalesce is for them to say they want a more formal setting out of government plans in what's called a white paper. of course the government could simply agree to that and ministers are confident they will be able to stick to their timetable and trigger article 50 by the end of march. thanks, carol. and a reminder, jean miller, who brought that case that went to the supreme court, will be speaking to us on breakfast at 8:10am. —— word gena miller. —— gena miller. president trump is reportedly preparing to sign several executive orders aimed at restricting immigration. it's expected he'll announce plans for a wall along the us border with mexico, one of his key election pledges. reports from washington say he's also planning tightened visa regulations from seven middle east and african countries. women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes to dress codes at work according to a parliamentary report. mps heard from hundreds of women who reported that the dress codes they were subject
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to were sexist. they began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. what to wear at work? sometimes there's no choice, and it's not always attractive. but what about being ordered to wear high heels? when nicola thorpe arrived for her first day at work, she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes with a two to four inch heel. when she refused, she was sent home without pay. what they state is it gives them a more professional look. a corporate, professional look. i'm not entirely sure why adding two or four inches to my height makes me more professional, or makes me walk in a professional manner. i don't think it affects how i come across. you can see me now, this is exactly what i would be wearing. and if it's just a matter of a couple of inches, i can stand tall without wearing heels. she then started a petition, which led to an inquiry by mps, who now want action
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from the government. we've come up with three recommendations. firstly, that the equalities act of 2010 obviously isn't quite addressing that bit. secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make—up may be a health and safety issue in the workplace. and thirdly, we are going to hopefully... if it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court. there'll be tribunals. at this company, receptionists can wear what they like. in its evidence, the government said the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed on nicola was unlawful. but the mps are calling on the government to do more to make the law more effective in protecting employees from discrimination at work. emma simpson, bbc news. david cameron has been appointed president of alzheimer's research uk. in an article in the times he says research into cancer and strokes deserve all their funding, but that dementia shouldn't be so far behind. his new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing down as an mp.
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they have waited for nearly 20 years, but finallyjapan has a sumo wrestling grand champion once again. 30—year—old kisenosato is the sport's new champion, known as the yokozuna. the last time a japanese wrestler won the title was in 1998. the last four grand champions have all been from mongolia. prior to that it was a wrestler from hawaii. i interviewed a grand champion once. amazing. incredibly strong. all that stuff about eating and eating and eating and going straight to sleep so you get more fat to improve your bulk. pretty much what i do! isn't
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that what we all do? exactly! let's talk sport of a slightly different white. johanna konta, she has been beaten overnight in melbourne, first time she has played serena williams —— different weight. she has changed her mental attitude going into the australian open and she has done very well. british number one, johanna konta, is out of the australian open. she was outplayed 6—2 6—3 in the quarter finals by six—time champion serena williams. our tennis correspondent russell fuller joins us from melbourne. she was in form coming into this but how one—sided was it? she was in form coming into this but how one-sided was it? not completely one—sided, she hadn't dropped a set here and she won the sydney tournament before the australian open but serena williams hadn't dropped a set either. as is often the case, when serena thinks there's a serious threat to her title
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chances on the other side of the net she raises her game and she did that today. she didn't always land her first serve in the right spot but when she did she invariably won the point or served an ace, very powerful, that exerts a lot of pressure on the other player. konta was a break of serve up in the second set and williams soon broke back and you felt at that stage there was only one winner. she's odds—on now to win a 23rd grand slam title, which would beat the record steffi g raf title, which would beat the record steffi graf currently shares for the most major titles won in the open era, the period since the late 1960s when tennis became open to professionals. that is something that serena has talked about, something she has got her eye on. but overall you would have to say this has been a really impressive tournament for konta? she has an amazing record in melbourne. she turned up last year and seeded and got to the semifinals, the first time she had been in the main draw
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having failed to qualify three times before. now with the pressure of defending ranking points from the year, if he had lost in the first round she wouldn't have gained very many and her ranking would have dropped, she's gone nearly as far by reaching the quarters and she has started to look like a potential grand slam champion. she will be in all the major tournaments and her coach was telling me she is confident she can do well at wimbledon. her best results have beenin wimbledon. her best results have been in america and australia on the ha rd courts been in america and australia on the hard courts but she leaves she can make major inroads when she pitches up make major inroads when she pitches up on the grass courts in a few months. richard fuller from melbourne this morning, our tennis correspondent. former olympic champion nicole cooke says british cycling is run by men for men and its attempts to stop doping are inadequate and ineffective. cooke made the claims in written evidence submitted to a culture, media and sport select committee yesterday. the session was held to discuss issues raised at a hearing involving british cycling and
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team sky last month. sir alex ferguson thinks jose mourinho is getting to grips with being manchester united manager. united are still in both domestic cup competitions and the europa league, but are sixth in the premier league, 1a points behind leaders chelsea. ferguson says mourinho has settled into the job after a turbulent start to his reign at old trafford. i think thatjose is finding solutions now. there was a period in the season when he wasn't making decisions and his motions boiled over. he is an emotional guy but the way you see him now, he's calm, he's in control. that's obvious... that's the obvious observation i am making of the team now. the team is playing with great energy, determination, will to win. which i think is really
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important. it's really interesting, he doesn't have to give an interview, sir alex ferguson, really interesting he has chosen now to give clear support to jose mourinho. he could keep quiet but he is definitely giving him his support. the ears team jose, isn't he! oakley. british five—time olympianjo pavey will run in this year's london marathon. the a3—year—old ran the event in 2011 setting a personal best of two hours, 28 minutes and 2a seconds. pavey says she hopes to use the race to set another pb and to qualify for the world championships in august. one of rugby union's oldest clubs, london welsh, has been kicked out of the championship after they were liquidated last month. the club was granted a temporary licence to play on, but he rugby football union says they haven't met the financial conditions required to extend that licence. all their results will be erased from this season's championship. and finally sweden's daniel bodin pulled off the first successful double backflip in a snowmobile.
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the double backflip has earned a reputation as the holy grail. 0h oh my goodness! there it is, one, goes around a whole number time. how long has he been practising bad for? —— nother. —— back for. —— that for. and now bodin, who has been working on this for two years, has nailed it. the world's most profitable toy business, lego, is having problems with counterfeits and copycats. it's a problem so big even the boss can't what is real and what is fake as
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robin brant has been finding out. billions and billions of these little plastic bricks have been sold the world over and now lego is betting big on china. what started out with hand—cut bricks in denmark in 19a9 is now a $100 million state—of—the—art operation near shanghai but they are not the only ones doing it. copies like this and fakes or counterfeits are prolific in china. lego is currently suing the firm behind this copycat star wnrs model. so how easy is it to spot the difference? we bought a real one and a copycat and asked the experts. if you have to ask me to guess, i would say this one, maybe. which one do you think is a real? you think this one is real. you're right. correct.
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the truth is, they look and feel almost identical. the copy‘s so good, in fact, that even the boss of that huge new lego factory can't tell. have a little look at that for me. what do you think of that? it looks like a mini figure to me. what do you think of him? two men. which one is yours? have a guess. i would say this is lego and this is not. 0k. this is lego. no, this is lego. bought from toy‘r'us yesterday, built by my daughter. that is not real. it's not lego. it is trying to be lego, is my assessment of it. lego is not the only foreign firm investing big in china but having trouble with local copycats.
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land rovers are now made here. white evoques like this sell particulalrly well. but the british firm has been powerless to stop this. tucked away on a shanghai side street, this is a land wind. it's similar on the inside and very, very similar on the outside but a lot cheaper. this is our copycat that caught people out. you can buy him and the real thing on the huge online retailer, alibaba. they took down thousands of links to copycat lego products last year alone but the toy maker is still pursuing manufacturers in the courts because even the boss cannot tell the difference. robin brant, bbc news, shanghai. that is just fascinating, isn't it? he is not happy at all. if even he can't tell the difference, what do you do? i suppose if it says something else... yes, look for the spelling. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a bill paving the way for brexit
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could be introduced as early as tomorrow, afterjudges ruled that parliament should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. president trump could announce his plans for a wall on the mexican border, as he promises a big day ahead on national security. now, the last few days, we have been telling you about how fog has been causing issues. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. is that from today? no, but it tells a story quite nicely. once again we've got fog, especially dense for southern and south—eastern england, affecting motorways and maybe flights as well. it is freezing fog. find out what is happening on the bbc local radio. freezing fog tells you it is cold outside, so watch out for slippery surfaces and black ice. we have all this fog on the
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south—east and we hang on to it for a while yet. it will be slow to clear. it will take to late morning and four others until late afternoon. so cold, foggy and frosty. in south—west england and wales you might see the odd pocket of fog but that is all. largely dry. most of northern england is dry. a couple of pockets of fog. . a lot when of cloud here and a mild start. it is currently 13 degrees. —5 in exeter. as cloud comes in from the near continent, it will lift the fog into low cloud, but sunshine for south—west england, wales, into northern england, murray firth, quite a bit of cloud for scotland and northern ireland with reining in the outer hebrides, nothing heavy.
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11 degrees, ten in the west, where it is feeling cold, especially where the cloud comes in in the south—east. through the evening and overnight not such an issue over the last couple of days, it will be windy to the west, but it will also be windy today. tonight there will be windy today. tonight there will be some drizzle around, we could see the odd flurry of light snow and widespread frost so that tomorrow you need to watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. and tomorrow, certainly call for the odd light snow flurry here and there. nothing substantial. maybe just on the roof of your car, that's all. a lot of dry weather around as well. look at the temperatures, five in aberdeen will feel more like —1, and wherever you are across the uk it will feel bitter with the nagging wind from the freezing fronts. on friday, dry weather around, a weather front from a south—west introducing rain and
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mild conditions from the south—west, and that we see temperatures picked up and that we see temperatures picked upa and that we see temperatures picked up a touch as well. ok, well, you have made us very happy that we have warm coats, thank you. and a lovely library picture, thank you very much. pleasure! i feel i library picture, thank you very much. pleasure! ifeeli have been firmly put in my place. she does it so gently. so nice. yes, it is a library picture. ok, i've learnt my lesson. having to wear high heels, make—up, shorter skirts or even dying their hair, those are just some examples of what women say they have been asked to do for theirjob. now mps are calling on the government to take action against discriminatory dress codes. ben has the details. yes, a really important area, and mps looking at whether it is as widespread as people believe. this story started last year when a woman was sent home from a tempjob in london after refusing to wear high heels. she launched a petition that gained over 150,000 signatures leading mps to investigate workplace
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and dress code discrimination. here are a few examples of what women say are their experiences. one air hostess described feeling humiliated due to company uniform policy. adding that there was one set of clothing rules for men and a different one for women. another woman working in a jewellery store said wearing high heels caused her serious pain. while a retail worker told mps she was offended dress rules which attracted unwanted attention from customers. let's speak to mp helenjones who chairs the parliamentary petitions committee. we've heard a snapshot of some stories — just how widespread did you find this to be? just how widespread is it? from the evidence we've had, it is very widespread indeed, and it feeds into a culture where women feel degraded
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and humiliated at work, which often a tt ra cts and humiliated at work, which often attracts u nwa nted and humiliated at work, which often attracts unwanted attention often from customers, which can go far as putting them at risk, you know, with exa m ples of putting them at risk, you know, with examples of people being followed home, for instance. so, give me some exa m ples of home, for instance. so, give me some examples of the proposals of what you would like changed, so it is clear with high heels, but not suggesting you could go to work wearing trainers, for example? no, it is clear that employers are entitled to impose a uniform policy, which requires people to be smart and well turned out, but if that policy impact more on women than men, then it can be indirect discrimination. the problem is that indirect discrimination can be justified if the employer says it is reasonably necessary in pursuit of a legitimate aim and tribunal is can find differently in different parts of the country. —— tribunals. we the
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test cases to clarify the law. and i think that is where it might be difficult because in some cases there would be great area where the employer says, this is the look i wa nt to employer says, this is the look i want to present for my phone to my customers and this is how i would expect you to dress accordingly to present a look to those customers. thatin present a look to those customers. that in some cases may not be discriminatory, am i right? it may not be but it is quite possible to draw upa not be but it is quite possible to draw up a dress code which isn't discriminatory between men and women. the agency which employed nicola for instance revised its dress code after what happened and came up with a much more satisfactory one. the problem is some employers don't even realise they may be discriminating and certainly don't realise they have to do the health and safety assessment. so, we are asking for the government to shore up guidelines for employers as well as doing a guideline for employees so that people understand what is expected of them and what is not. and who will police it? well,
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hopefully we see the quality and human rights commission taking some more cases in order to clarify the law but we would really like to see much more information from employers so they get it right in the first place. ok, it is good to talk to you, helen. thank you very much. and we will speak with the chief executive of the chartered management institute which promotes nest practice in business leadership. and i must point out it is not just leadership. and i must point out it is notjust women. my head demands men wear a tie while women wear what they like. whatever it is, they might be experiencing different codes of practice. that is true, there might be an issue, and what you cannot do with a dress code is have gender discrimination against men or women, and you can't compromise health and safety. high
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heels actually do both. so that is the guidance. it is fine if you are a hairdresser and you want to look full and you have to wear black. that is ok —— cool. it is something that compromises health and safety or discriminate. that said i think exa m ples or discriminate. that said i think examples discriminating against women are more widespread. what sort of exa m women are more widespread. what sort of exam boards they become across? well, we just of exam boards they become across? well, wejust did of exam boards they become across? well, we just did some research at cmi that found quite astoundingly that four out of five managers have witnessed gender discrimination against women in the workplace. so it is not just against women in the workplace. so it is notjust dress codes. the most common forms were inappropriate remarks, the so—called locker room dan dyer. -- banter. women in meetings finding it hard to have themselves heard. is it common and how does it manifest itself? absolutely, well, that was the most second most common form of
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discrimination, almost 70%, and it is mansplaining, or even manerrupting. laughter. there is some. . . manerrupting. laughter. there is some... laughter. lots of comments coming in as well. patricia says, i have no issues with dress codes as long as they are consistent and apply equally so that men and women have to wear them, so women have to wear a suit have to wear them, so women have to weara suitand have to wear them, so women have to wear a suit and men do the same, perhaps with a tie. theo says, at an investment bank the dress code for males was more strict than for females. marcus says a tie is ridiculously uncomfortable and has no place in modern life. ifeel that we are inappropriately dressed. yeah, true. those comments echo a lot. women saying, here is an example, i was asked to wear skirts above the knee, make—up, and the employer was suggesting that is what
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the job is all about, but you are right, andy says teaching women has no expectation, men have to wear this suit and tie and it is about universality? well, it is, and by way i think if men don't want to wear a tie then they shouldn't have to, so that is a... can you speak to the boss? it applies to both sexes. there is a serious side to this. there is a serious side to this. there is a serious side to this. there is still gender discrimination primarily affecting women and it is not just little things, primarily affecting women and it is notjust little things, it is big things like promotions and pay. you make a very good point. what do you make a very good point. what do you make about... does it need to be a culture change to see things in a different light? absolutely, i think there needs to be a culture change and we know that from our research and we know that from our research and this sort of tolerant of little things, so, little remarks, you know, you have to apply lipstick, can know, you have to apply lipstick, ca n ofte n know, you have to apply lipstick, can often almost act as condoning
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the big things. so, really, our request is, speak out if you see an inappropriate remark, call out your employer if there is an inappropriate dress code. challenge the smaller things and hopefully that will take over all the big things as well. thank you. and thank you for getting in touch. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. several businesses in wembley have been destroyed after a large fire gutted a building on an industrial estate. it began on monday evening but wasn't brought under control until tuesday afternoon. over 120 fire—fighters tackled the blaze. the cause is not yet known and an investigation has begun. an independent review over controversial plans to redevelop land around millwall's football stadium is to be held by lewisham council.
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if the development goes ahead, the club has suggested it could force them to leave the area. bbc london has seen a letter from the council's chief executive saying that the decision will be reviewed independently. a high court ruling has paved the way for the removal of a protest camp at leith hill in surrey. campaigners are worried about the environmental impact of europa's plans to create a test drilling well in the area of natural beauty. the company believes that a substantial reservoir of oil could exist beneath the surrey hills. it's expected the protestors will be evicted within the next few days. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good news if you're using the tubes this morning as all lines look like they're running well at the moment. butjust a warning that from 9pm tonight tube drivers on the central and waterloo & city lines will walk out for 2a—hours. on the trains, southeastern still has various diversions in place after a freight train derailed yesterday.
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make sure you check their website for information about yourjourney. on the roads, trinity road in wandsworth is closed southbound between east hill and the a3 because of an incident. and victoria street in westminster is closed off in both directions because of a burst water main between broadway and buckingham gate. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another cold and foggy start to the day. now, the fog quite extensive in places. we didn't get it yesterday, so some thick, freezing fog and it is cold. so the met office has issued a weather warning for the dense and potentially freezing fog, but also for the ice risk as well. through the course of the morning, we have cloud moving in through the continent. that will help with the cloud away. the air underneath the cloud much colder, it's going to feel very chilly this afternoon. the maximum temperature struggling between 1—a degrees. overnight tonight, another very cold one with widespread frost, temperatures dropping down. still a little bit of mist and fog but a bit more of a breeze helping to keep it moving.
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the minimum temperature between 0 and —1 in towns and cities, so a very cold day tomorrow with chilly air from the continent. on friday, similar conditions. through the weekend we have this area of low pressure, which brings showers across us through much of saturday. if you're looking for a better day of the two, sunday's the best bet for the moment, so for the next couple of days, for tomorrow, a very cold day, the air coming in from the continent, temperatures in single figures, two or three at best. a chilly night on friday with some slightly less cold air as we head into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the government prepares to put its plan for brexit before the commons. yesterday, judges ruled that mps should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. it's thought a bill could now be introduced as early as tomorrow. i'll be live at westminster where
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ministers are urging mps not to try and thwart the will of the people but opposition parties and some tories are demanding more detail and a greater say in the brexit process. good morning, it's wednesday 25th january. also this morning: president trump promises a big day ahead on national security, including an announcement about his plans for a wall on the mexican border. in business, can a company impose a dress code for staff? from high heels to short skirts, two parliamentary reports say no. firms must not and can not tell workers what to wear. johanna konta has been knocked out the australian open. she lost her quarter—final to serena williams 6—2 6—3 in just over an hour in melbourne.
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she was the last brit left in the competition. also this morning: a toy story with a difference. which one's yours? i would say this is lego, this is not. ok, this is lego. no, this is lego. we'll find out how one of the world's best known brands is counting the cost of counterfeits in china. and carol has the weather. good morning. once again this morning there is freezing fog, especially across southern and south—eastern england. also black eyes to watch out for but there will be some sunshine, a wee bit of drizzle and strong winds in the north—west. i'll put all that together in 15 minutes. —— black eyes. good morning. first, our main story. mps have stepped up demands for the government to publish its plan for brexit in a formal policy document.
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the demands for a white paper, including from some conservatives, follows yesterday's supreme court ruling. theresa may must give parliament a vote before triggering article 50, the formal process for leaving to the eu. it's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. after thejudges ruled only parliament can start brexit, today a warning for mps — don't to try to derail the plan. the supreme courtjudgement means a bill on triggering article 50, the start of britain's exit process, must be put before mps and lords. so what lies on the road ahead? the government says legislation paving the way for brexit will be tabled within days — that will be voted on by both houses of parliament. theresa may wants article 50 triggered by the end of march, then britain has two years to leave the eu. so there can be no going back. the point of no return was passed injune 23, last year. labour say they won't block article 50 but want to amend the bill
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to give mps more control of the process. if necessary, there will be hand—to—hand combat on this. we need to make sure that we get the best deal on behalf the whole country and she can't say she acts on behalf the whole country. theresa may also faces opposition from some of her own mps, who wanta formal exit document to be debated. but for now, at least, ministers believe they are on track to get brexit triggered by the spring. tom bateman, bbc news our political correspondent carol walker is outside the houses of parliament. so, the process starts now and there will be so many discussions, the government at the moment saying it can stay on track. what are your thoughts? we know that tomorrow we expect the government to publish the bill it was forced to introduce to the commons by that decision of the supreme court yesterday. ministers
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are saying that will be a short and straightforward bill and it will essentially ask parliament to approve the triggering of article 50 to begin the formal brexit negotiations. but already we're hearing how mps on all sides are going to try to put down the mance, the changes they want to try to make to that legislation as it goes through the commons. —— the amendments. labour say they want a meaningful vote so if mps don't like the final deal they can send the prime minister back to get a better one. the lib dems are saying they would like a second referendum at the end of the process and the snp aren't happy. one area where they could get the support of conservative rebel mps is the idea ofa conservative rebel mps is the idea of a white paper, formerly setting out the government approach to negotiations. the government hasn't ruled that out, it could publish plans ina ruled that out, it could publish plans in a white paper. ministers are sounding pretty confident they
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will be able to stick to their timetable, trigger article 50 and start those formal negotiations by the end of march. carol walker, thank you very much. we'll be speaking to businesswoman gina miller, who took the case to the supreme court, just after 8am this morning. president trump has said a big day is planned on national security today, including an announcement on building a wall on the us border with mexico, one of his main campaign pledges. in a message on twitter, he also said to expect many other things. reports from washington say he will sign several executive orders relating to immigration and border security over the coming days. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. we're going to have our borders nice and strong, we're going to build a wall. we're going to build the wall... it was the soundtrack to donald trump's unorthodox campaign for president, a call to build a wall along america's southern border with mexico. now he seems set to press ahead with measures he believes are vital to stemming the illegal flow of immigrants into the united states. the president on his twitter account said simply: he's vowed to make mexico
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pay for it what's more, although the mexican government has refused to do so. later in the week, to round off a busy start to his presidency, mr trump is expected to sign executive orders, closing america's borders to refugees and limiting access to citizens from seven african and middle eastern countries, countries the administration believes export terrorism. they're mainly muslim countries but the mantra of the trump administration is america first. a country that traditionally has opened its doors to immigrants is about to head in the opposite direction. david willis, bbc news, washington. women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes to dress codes at work according to a parliamentary report. mps heard from hundreds of women who reported that the dress codes they were subject to were sexist.
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they began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. what to wear at work? sometimes there's no choice, and it's not always attractive. but what about being ordered to wear high heels? when nicola thorpe arrived for her first day at work, she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes with a two to four inch heel. when she refused, she was sent home without pay. what they state is it gives them a more professional look. a corporate, professional look. i'm not entirely sure why adding two or four inches to my height makes me more professional, or makes me walk in a professional manner. i don't think it affects how i come across. you can see me now, this is exactly what i would be wearing. and if it's just a matter of a couple of inches, i can stand tall without wearing heels. she then started a petition, which led to an inquiry by mps,
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who now want action from the government. we've come up with three recommendations. firstly, that the equalities act of 2010 obviously isn't quite addressing that bit. secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make—up may be a health and safety issue in the workplace. and thirdly, we are going to hopefully... if it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court. there'll be tribunals. at this company, receptionists can wear what they like. in its evidence, the government said the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed on nicola was unlawful. but the mps are calling on the government to do more to make the law more effective in protecting employees from discrimination at work. david cameron has been appointed president
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of alzheimer's research uk. in an article in the times he says research into cancer and strokes deserve all their funding, but that dementia shouldn't be so far behind. his new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing down as an mp. an rnli lifeboat station in yorkshire has a new crew member, basil the fox. the wild animal has befriended the team and has become a regular visitor to the station. they say he's nearly as tame as a pet dog, and as you can see, he certainly isn't camera shy. i don't know how good he is at rescuing people! thanks for being with us today. bowel cancer is the uk's second biggest cancer killer, and every day another 110 people are diagnosed with the disease. but the age at which people are screened varies. the charity beating bowel cancer wants to see everyone tested from the age of 50, in line with scotland. it says this would dramatically boost early diagnosis. let's talk to dorothy
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byres from edinburgh, who was diagnosed at the aged of 52. and andrew renehan, professor of cancer studies at the christie hospital in manchester, who also works with beating bowel cancer. good morning to you both and thanks for joining good morning to you both and thanks forjoining us. good morning to you both and thanks for joining us. take good morning to you both and thanks forjoining us. take us through your story. you were diagnosed when you we re story. you were diagnosed when you were just 52 and this was through a routine screening, why did you even do the routine screening? in actual fa ct do the routine screening? in actual fact the day i received my screening kit was on my 52nd birthday and i had just been out with my family for a birthday celebration and my sister had told us her partner, colin, advanced bowel cancer and, you know, it wasn't good news. when i went home and saw my bowel screening kit in the post i managed to complete it in record time and send it off. a lot of people don't like the screening kit and they say, you know, it doesn't make a very good
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birthday present but for me it was the best birthday present i ever received. how accurate are those tests normally? yeah, so, in short they are very accurate. the uk has led ina they are very accurate. the uk has led in a lot of the research in this area over the last two decades. we have run big trials and we've done a lot of quality assurance and quality control in these areas. and this is a very effective way of screening for bowel cancer. you had no symptoms at all but they found out you had stage three? mine was a stage three, yes. which must have been a shock to you but thank goodness you did the screening? yes, i was very surprised because i had no idea, i seemed quite healthy and fit but i had stage three bowel cancer. the important thing here is the age difference and you're arguing we should bring things in line with the situation that dorothy found herself in in scotland because it is currently different in other parts of the uk? yes, outside of
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scotland, england, wales and northern ireland, this form of screening starts at the age of 60 so the argument is to bring this down to 50. this is a very effective way of beating bowel cancer and beating these deaths from bowel cancer. how much difference does early diagnosis make? a lot of people are diagnosed perhaps when they come into a&e? that's something we want to get rid of the. when i trained ten or 15 years ago a quarter of patients were coming through as emergencies. that's a lot of patients. it's expensive. it's a lot of radical and morbid surgery. treating them earlier can now be done a lot simpler. we very often used keyhole types of surgery and they can avoid things like chemotherapy, so that's the way forward. dorothy comer can you understand, i know you said it was the best birthday present ever,
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there is a stigma about it but the importance of diagnosis is so crucial but there's embarrassment involved? yes there is. but when you look at what the alternatives can be, it's a no—brainerto look at what the alternatives can be, it's a no—brainer to complete the screening when you're invited to do so. how are you now? absolutely fine. you've had treatment, what was that like? it was challenging. i had an operation and then i had six months of chemotherapy, which was challenging. but there's lots of things in life that are challenging. i was just things in life that are challenging. i wasjust wondering things in life that are challenging. i was just wondering about the cost implication. also the number of people that might go through this process for whom it would be entirely unnecessary, is it worth it to catch up with that early diagnosis do you think? there's two crises, the cost issue again has been looked at a/20 years in this country by health economists. a thai time again it comes out as
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cost—effective — — time again it comes out as cost—effective —— for 20 years. —— time and time again. these are people and working age and we returned them back to work at a normal productive age. it is devastating news to hear you have cancer, what is your message to people going for the test and getting a diagnosis they don't necessarily want to hear? despite people knowing about this with still lagging behind in terms of uptake. typically for this test uptake across the country runs at about 60% so that the likes behind for instance breast cancer, which is 70%. the first message is we need greater uptake. it's a simple test, as dorothy has shown, and the message is once we find it, yes it's bad news but it's eminently treatable. good to see you looking and feeling so well. we have public health or these in northern ireland, england and wales and we asked them for a response. wales is looking at
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extending it, northern ireland is looking at different approaches across the country before making changes. public health england says evidence shows the best way to reduce deaths is to combine the scope test at 55 with regular screening from the age of 60. thank you very much four x four of your input. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a bill paving the way for brexit could be introduced as early as tomorrow, afterjudges ruled that parliament should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. president trump could announce his plans for a wall on the mexican border, as he promises a big day ahead on national security. let's get a weather update from carol. i'm not going to ask you anything about that picture, but it looks lovely. good morning, it is lovely, isn't it, and it tells another story because once again this morning especially in southern and south—eastern parts of england
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there is some freezing fog, travel disruption is possible, you can find out more on the bbc local radio station but the freezing weather gives you a hint of the temperatures, it is a cold start, it is frosty, this is a crossing word in particular, and we are looking at some black ice on 100 services, so if you're heading out, buried in mind, you will have to scrape the windscreen —— untreated surfaces. across the midlands, southern counties, this is where we have some fog, patchy and dance as well —— bearin fog, patchy and dance as well —— bear in mind. it is a cold start for wales, with a fair bit of cloud around and no problems with the fog as such —— dense. just the odd pocket. across the bow of york, the odd pocket of fog. most of northern england is fog free and the odd pocket for parts of scotland but scotla nd pocket for parts of scotland but scotland and northern ireland are off toa scotland and northern ireland are off to a very mild start —— the vale off to a very mild start —— the vale of york. temperatures around 12 or 13 at the moment. through the morning you will find as we import cloud from any continent the fog
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will lift into low cloud. —— from the near continent. as it happens it will feel cold in the south—east. we have sunshine for south—west england and wales, into northern england, murray first and parts of northern ireland, but we also have a weather front coming in and that is going to bring rain for western scotland and also the north—west of northern ireland. if you are out celebrating this evening, wrap up warmly because, once again, it is going to because, once again, it is going to be cold with a fair bit of cloud coming across our shores, producing grizzle or light snow but snow should not present a problem, but there is also widespread frost so thatice there is also widespread frost so that ice might be a problem first thing in the morning —— drizzle. that is to bear in mind. so tomorrow we start off on that cold note. again we are dragging in this cold continental air. it is going to feel better tomorrow. for many of us it will be dry but it will be cold enough here and there a0 odd flurry of light snow. so manchester tomorrow's maximum temperatures one
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degree. —— for the odd flurry. it will feel like —a here, and as we had into friday we drag in the cold, continental air, with a lot of dry weather around on friday but, having said that, you can see the array of weather front here the west, the atla ntic weather front here the west, the atlantic front is bringing in some rain and as they do so, know the temperatures in the south—west of northern ireland, starting to climb. ahead of that, temperatures slowly start to rise as well. so, into the weekend, well, the john start to rise as well. so, into the weekend, well, thejohn carlson showers, some sunshine and it will be less chilly, sunday at the moment looks like the driest and best day of the week and —— the chance of some showers. well, at the moment. good clarification. talking today about enforced dress codes and women being told to wear high heels and reapply make up. loads of comments. andrew says when i wore a hawaiian
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t—shirt it was cited in the dress code as unacceptable but it didn't apply to female floral shirts. marcus... (laughter).. apply to female floral shirts. marcus... (laughter) .. that is apply to female floral shirts. marcus... (laughter).. that is a very good comment. anonymous comment and you might see why. it isn't about a quality but the forced sexuality of women. men not wearing ties ina sexuality of women. men not wearing ties in a position of importance in the office or frontline media jobs don't command respect. julie says the only dress code should apply to all employees and the example is to dress smartly or a uniform is provided in hazardous areas as it is dangerous to wear high heels and i can't wear them because i fall over. injapan can't wear them because i fall over. in japan department stores can't wear them because i fall over. injapan department stores ban staff from earings and nail varnish which is different from cosmetic staff in the uk. thank you for your comments andi the uk. thank you for your comments and i cannot believe we are talking about christmas. i am disappointed that ben isn't in a hawaiian shirt. can we just chat, actually, because dan and! can we just chat, actually, because dan and i have to wear a tie, not because the boss says we have to but
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we feel we have to, so if you are watching and you think we need to wear a watching and you think we need to weara tight, watching and you think we need to wear a tight, let us know. let us know if we have to wear a tie. do you not want to? take it off. shall i take it off? 0k, you not want to? take it off. shall itake it off? ok, i you not want to? take it off. shall i take it off? ok, i am you not want to? take it off. shall itake it off? 0k, lam not you not want to? take it off. shall i take it off? ok, i am not going to do it now. that is the fear. thank you so much. we are still talking about christmas. in the last few minutes we've had a couple of christmas updates from the high street. whsmith says like—for—like sales rose 5% boosted by its stores at train stations and airports. but it's a familiar tale on the high—street where sales fell again, this time, by 3%. it also opened another 32 post offices and announced plan to open 23 more by the end of the year. restaurant group, the firm that runs frankie & benny's and garfunkels, says sales fell 3.9% over the last year. it says its now focusing on cutting prices to win back customers. it also warned of the extra cost of the new minimum wage, higher business rates, rising energy prices and extra costs because of the devaluation of the pound and rising food prices. and £8 billion was wiped off
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the value of bt yesterday as shares slumped 20% over an accounting scandal in italy, which could lead to a big fall in overall profits. problems with bt‘s italian business were found to be much worse than first thought, including misreporting profits and borrowing money to pay debts. bt has fired its italian management team but british boss gavin patterson is under fire to explain how the problems occurred in the first place. iam i am probably going to get in trouble for that now, but let's find out if we can wear and tie once and for all. oh, look at the body
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language. it is all right.|j for all. oh, look at the body language. it is all right. iam going to wicked off. after 8am, no tie, yeah? don't negotiate on air. —— whip it off. tie, yeah? don't negotiate on air. -- whip it off. you are forcing me into an uncomfortable situation. exactly. a number of female mps have told the bbc that they've received physical and verbal threats, and fear for their safety following the death of the labour mpjo cox. in a survey by bbc radio 5 live, some said they'd also experienced sexist language in the commons, and even considered giving up theirjob. at a time when more women are being encouraged to go into politics, how off—putting is this? our political correspondent ellie price has been finding out. it wasn't easy getting women the vote. it took even longer to get women into parliament. the first female mp to take her seat, nancy astor, was elected 98 years ago. eventually, more would follow. it gives me the greatest pleasure to introduce to you the new national unionist women members. back then, of course, they didn't have social media,
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unlike the 195 female mps today. so, what you're looking at are the abusive tweets that my team screen shotted. anne mclauchlan mp won't read the abuse she receives online. which is just as well, it's deeply personal, she doesn't want to share it. it takes a lot of strength not to. it's tempting if you are alone at night and no one can see you if you get upset to just have a look. but why would i do that to myself? i have to say, i very much see the silver lining in not getting reelected, the silver lining is i may never have to put up with that sort of abuse again in my life, because it doesn't happen unless you've got some kind of high profile,
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and then people think they have carte blanche to call you whatever they want to call you. but it isn'tjust hurtful insults on social media, there's an even darker side of death threats and violence. jo cox was murdered outside her constituency surgery last june. two thirds of female mps we spoke to say they have felt less safe ever since. well over half have received a physical threat from a member of the public. this is the room where i hold my surgeries. tulip sadik begrudgingly makes sure she has security whenever she holds these surgeries. you feel safe now? this building is a secure building, there is a police presence outside, staff are supportive, so i feel safer. it was one of my staff members who opened the letter, quite a young staff member, i felt sorry for them, opening this letter that said they wanted to butcher my family. the office got in touch with me and said, we need to take it to the police.
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i took swift action. the police were quick to respond. it makes me think, who has time to sit and write a letter to an mp saying, i want to kill you and your family? it all paints rather a grim picture, and certainly the majority of mps we spoke to say they're concerned that hearing about this sort of abuse might put off good new people, good new women, from wanting to become mps. in fact, a third of those we heard from said they have considered giving up theirjob here in parliament because of it. and yet none of them have. and the majority we heard from say, despite the difficulties, thejob is a privilege, and well worth the flak. it is very interesting, we are talking about that and as well talking about that and as well talking about that and as well talking about what women are being made to wear to work as well, so it is kind of a theme. yes, keep your comments coming in, because it is lovely to read, there is a cross—section of opinion. lovely to read, there is a cross-section of opinion. yes. coming up this morning on breakfast: the copy—cat lego that's so good even the boss can't tell the difference.
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we have a special report on china's counterfeit marketplace. notjust not just toys, it notjust toys, it is cars being made as well. yes, all sorts, and how can you tell, because if the boss doesn't know? the children seem to know. you will see later on the young girl is shown the fake and the real and straightaway she says, that is the real one and that is right. we will be back at 7:30am. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. several businesses in wembley have been destroyed after a large fire gutted a building on an industrial estate. it began on monday evening but wasn't brought under control until tuesday afternoon. over 120 fire—fighters tackled the blaze. the cause is not yet known and an investigation has begun. an independent review over controversial plans to redevelop land around millwall's football stadium is to be held by lewisham council. if the development goes ahead, the club has suggested it could force them to leave the area.
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bbc london has seen a letter from the council's chief executive saying that the decision will be reviewed independently. a high court ruling has paved the way for the removal of a protest —— a protest camp in surrey will be removed after a decision was made by the high court. they are protesting plans to create a test drilling well in the area of natural beauty. the company believes that a substantial reservoir of oil could exist beneath the surrey hills. it's expected the protestors will be evicted within the next few days. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good news if you're using the tubes this morning as all lines look like they're running well at the moment. butjust a warning that from 9pm tonight tube drivers on the central and waterloo & city lines will walk out for 2a—hours. on the trains, southeastern still has various diversions in place after a freight train derailed yesterday. make sure you check their website for information about yourjourney.
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we for information about yourjourney. have the usual roads we have the usual buildup on the roads on the blackwall tunnel, busy at the approach and the m25 clockwise at junction 5 at the approach and the m25 clockwise atjunction 5 for sevenoaks. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another cold and foggy start to the day. now, the fog quite extensive in places. we didn't get it yesterday, so some thick, freezing fog and it's feeling cold. so the met office has issued a weather warning for the dense and potentially freezing fog, but also for the ice risk as well. through the course of the morning, we have cloud moving in through the continent. that will help to eat the cloud away. the air underneath the cloud much colder, it's going to feel very chilly this afternoon. the maximum temperature struggling between 1—a degrees. overnight tonight, another very cold one, widespread frost, temperatures dropping down. still a little bit of mist and fog
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but a bit more of a breeze helping to keep it moving. the minimum temperature between 0 and —1 in towns and cities, so a very cold day tomorrow, taht air still very chilly air from the near continent. on friday, similar conditions. through the weekend we have this area of low pressure, which spins some showers across us through much of saturday. if you're looking for a better day of the two, sunday's your best bet for the moment, so for the next couple of days, for tomorrow, a very cold day, the air coming in from the continent, temperatures only in single figures, two or three at best. a chilly night into friday but some slightly less cold air as we head into the weekend. now, it's back to louise and dan. x hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. mps have increased pressure on theresa may to set out her negotiating position on brexit. the demands for a white paper, including from some
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conservatives, follow yesterday's supreme court ruling. the prime minister must now give parliament a vote before triggering article 50. it's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow. president trump is reportedly preparing to sign several executive orders aimed at restricting immigration. it's expected he'll announce plans for a wall along the us border with mexico, one of his key election pledges. reports from washington say he's also planning tightened visa regulations from seven middle east and african countries. women in the workplace are being told what to wear, how to have their hair and how much make up they need to put on, according to a report into office discrimination. mps began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. they heard examples of sexism from hundreds of women. the problem is that indirect
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discrimination can be justified the problem is that indirect discrimination can bejustified if the employer says it is reasonably necessary in pursuit of a legitimate aim and tribunal is can find differently in different parts of the country. so we need more test cases so the law's clarified. the screening age for bowel cancer in england, wales and northern ireland should be reduced to 50 years old, according to the charity beating bowel cancer. scotland is the only part of the uk which screens from 50. the charity says that if other parts of the uk came into line, a,000 patients a year would have the opportunity to be diagnosed earlier. ten or 15 years ago a quarter of patients were coming through as emergencies. that's a lot of patients. it's expensive. it's a lot of radical and morbid surgery. treating them earlier can now be done a lot simpler. we very often used keyhole types of surgery and they can avoid things like chemotherapy,
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so that's the way forward. david cameron has been appointed president of alzheimer's research uk. in an article in the times he says research into cancer and strokes deserve all their funding, but that dementia shouldn't be so far behind. his new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing down as an mp. they have waited for nearly 20 years, but finallyjapan has a sumo wrestling grand champion once again. 30—year—old kisenosato is the sport's new champion, known as the yokozuna. the last time a japanese wrestler won the title was in 1998. the last four grand champions have all been from mongolia. prior to that it was a wrestler from hawaii. i tell you what, impressive. you wouldn't want to mess with him. and there's an interview about the food he eats. paid stacks of grub and then they go straight to sleep so it
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turns to fat as quickly as possible. —— paid stacks of grub. turns to fat as quickly as possible. -- paid stacks of grub. sounds like my dream life —— and they eat stacks of grub. —— they eat stacks of grub. we have been talking aboutjohanna konta this morning, british number one, not fantastic news for her but she's had a great tournament. johann konta has been knocked of the australian open this morning. she lost to serena williams 6—2 6—3 in just over an hour in melbourne. she was the last brit left in the competition. she had been on a nine match winning streak. she is now two victories away from claiming an open era record 23rd major title. i think overall she played at a higher level than i did today and i think she showed why she is arguably one of the best of all time. so i think, yeah, i really enjoyed my
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time out there on court against her. i think time out there on court against her. ithinki time out there on court against her. i think i was able... i hope i'll be able to bring a lot away from it and thinks i'll be able to reuse and hopefully i'll get a chance to play heragain, and for hopefully i'll get a chance to play her again, and for other matches as well. former olympic champion nicole cooke says british cycling is run by men for men and its attempts to stop doping are inadequate and ineffective. cooke made the claims in written evidence submitted to a culture, media and sport select committee yesterday. the session was held to discuss issues raised at a hearing involving british cycling and team sky last month. sir alex ferguson thinks jose mourinho is getting to grips with being manchester united manager. united are still in both domestic cup competitions and the europa league, but are sixth in the premier league, 1a points behind leaders chelsea. ferguson says mourinho has settled into the job after a turbulent start to his reign at old trafford.
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i think thatjose is finding solutions now. there was a period there in the season when he wasn't getting decisions and his emotions boiled over. he is an emotional guy but the way you see him now, he's calm, he's in control. that's the obvious... that's the obvious observation i am making of the team now. the team's mirroring its manager. it's playing with great energy, determination, will to win, which i think is really important. england's women have drawn 0—0 with sweden in murcia, it was the second of two friendlies in spain. siobhan chamberlain saved a second half penalty. the next step in england's preparation for the european championship is to take part in the shebelieves cup, a four—team tournament in the usa. i think everyone will be happy with how the week's gone. everyone's
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pretty much got minutes and that's fantastic, especially at international level and everyone who's come out here has performed and as! who's come out here has performed and as i said before, it will give mark a headache and hopefully going forward into the she will give us a bit more fitness and match sharpness and hope us get results out there. british five—time olympianjo pavey will run in this year's london marathon. the a3—year—old ran the event in 2011 setting a personal best of two hours, 28 minutes and 2a seconds. pavey says she hopes to use the race to set another pb and to qualify for the world championships in august. that is really fast! when i read that i think two hours, 28 minutes and 2a seconds. it's ridiculous, it's not allowed! you've got a big guest in the next hour?|j it's not allowed! you've got a big guest in the next hour? i have, alun wynjones, guest in the next hour? i have, alun wyn jones, the guest in the next hour? i have, alun wynjones, the welsh captain, he will be talking about the six nations and their preparations for the six nations. let your questions
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come in for that! meanwhile he's not too happy to hear this. one of rugby union's oldest clubs, london welsh, has been kicked out of the championship after they were liquidated last month. the club was granted a temporary licence to play on, but he rugby football union says they haven't met the financial conditions required to extend that licence. all their results will be erased from this season's championship. and finally sweden's daniel bodin pulled off the first successful double backflip in a snowmobile. the double backflip has earned a reputation as the holy grail. lots of people have tried, many people have failed. and now bodin, who has been working on this for two years, has nailed it. amazing to watch. how do you work on it, how do you practise? don't you do it ona it, how do you practise? don't you do it on a big foam? with a snowmobile? i'm not the expert, i'm just guessing! maybe you try it with a bike to start with. all that
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timing and balance. congratulations to him. see you later with alun wyn jones. la la land may have dominated the oscar nominations, but there's more to the academy awards than just hollywood blockbusters. the white helmets is a story about a team of volunteers saving lives in syria, and it's been nominated for the best short documentary. in a moment we'll chat to the british team behind it, but first let's take a look. the latest missile attacks on hospitals and schools in rebel held areas have left up to 50 civilians dead. it isa it is a really powerful bit of cinema. director orlando von einsiedel and producerjoanna natasegara are with us now. i have no shame in telling you i
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watched this on the train yesterday andi watched this on the train yesterday and i was in bits on the train. it is such a powerful story and so beautifully told. congratulations on the nomination first of all. thank you very much. syria is such a difficult issue for people to engage with and these guys are a story of hope. they are real—life heroes, they are civilians just like us, just like the viewers watching at home who decided to every day get up and risk their lives to said strangers. tell us about what they are doing, they are going in to help people as much as they can? —— said strangers. their volunteer rescue workers, instead of fleeing or taking upa workers, instead of fleeing or taking up a gun they help when people are needing it —— said strangers. —— save strangers. people are needing it —— said strangers. -- save strangers. some of the footage i know you have, a lot of it was just too distressing, upsetting to use, wasn't it? yeah.
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what you see in this film, you still see some quite graphic scenes but it was a very see some quite graphic scenes but it was a very small fraction of the original material which if we had included would have made the film unwatchable by its graphic nature. there was one powerful part when the tea m there was one powerful part when the team pull out a baby and the baby is alive, it is less than two weeks old, they're in tears when they do it and when you're asking the white helmets to retell the story, it is so powerfully told and one life rescued had a huge impact on so many? it did, baby makhmudov was less than two weeks old and underneath a 3—storey building —— the mood. nobody thought he would be alive and he was when they pulled him out 16 hours later. in the film you see the reunion between the white helmets that saved him. you see the reunion between the white helmets that saved himlj think we can see a bit of that now. have a look. in another part of the film you can
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hear the baby crying and the jubilation from the white helmets as they pull this little child from the rubble. it's extraordinary, they had been searching for 16 hours and they almost gave up hope they would find anyone else alive and then one of them suddenly hears this faint sound ofa them suddenly hears this faint sound of a baby crying and that gave eve ryo ne of a baby crying and that gave everyone hope and energy again and they kept digging and we get to that moment where you see the baby being pulled out by the white helmets. it's all to ditch from them, you couldn't go out there or be there for very obvious reasons. yeah, the team we chose to focus on was from eastern aleppo, which we've seen so many times is the most dangerous place for journalists. many times is the most dangerous place forjournalists. we did film on the border of syria and turkey with them in the training camp but it's a combination of our footage and beautiful work from a young cameraman and a couple of his colleagues, they were really documenting the work in eastern aleppo and working with us to put that in the film. i no you don't
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make films to collect awards, but what is it like for you to receive this oscar nomination —— i no you don't. personally we're over the moon but far more importantly it's a fantastic opportunity to keep a focus on the work these guys do and the risk they take everyday. extraordinary. presumably their work carries on? absolutely it does, u nfortu nately carries on? absolutely it does, unfortunately they are still digging, they are still working in areas where they can, they're a target of the regime so now they're out of the stem aleppo but into other areas. your background is in directing and producing and journalism, the veracity of the footage, you know where it's come from —— eastern aleppo. footage, you know where it's come from -- eastern aleppo. we went through dozens of hours of material and we did our homework working out exactly where that staff had come from. it's not just exactly where that staff had come from. it's notjust us, there's been numerous otherjournalists who have done exactly the same sort of work on this material to verify it.
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people have seen hours and hours of news footage, it's fascinating to see a different life and these people doing amazing jobs. a really powerful film, people doing amazing jobs. a really powerfulfilm, congratulations. will you be going out to the oscars? we will, and we hope some of the guys from the film will be able to join us as well. great. thanks for joining us. the oscar—nominated documentary the white helmets is available to watch on netflix. more fog? yes, freezing fog, especially for southern and south—eastern england, heading into the midlands as well, apache fog elsewhere, but this is where the fog is most dense, and it tells you it is most dense, and it tells you it isa is most dense, and it tells you it is a cold start —— the patchy fog. if you are heading out, watch out for black ice on untreated surfaces. this is where we currently have the fog, and it is patchy and dense. it
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is on par with what we had on monday. it is a cold start with the risk of ice, as i mentioned, and south—west, at 9am this morning, we are into the sunshine with temperatures that bit higher. in wales we have a little fog, not much around the welsh marches, giving way to some sunshine. as we moved to northern england, some fog along the vale of york, lifting to see some sunshine. sunshine around murray firth but for scotland and northern ireland it is cloudy to start and mild, and windy out to the west with gales across the far north—west of scotland, even severe gales with exposure. through the day we are importing cloud from the new continent, which will lift the fog, so it will be cold in the south—east, but as we push across where we have the sunshine we are looking at 7—9, and the highest temperatures north—west scotland and northern ireland. through the evening and overnight it will still
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be windy in the west, it will be breezy for the rest of the uk, so it doesn't mean we won't have such issues with fog but we have widespread frost, we will see some drizzle, light snow flurries, so there could be some ice first thing tomorrow morning, something to bear in my if you are travelling and once again leave extra time to scrape your car windscreen. tomorrow it is a cold and frosty start, watch out for the ice, for many it will be dry but tomorrow we have a keen raw nagging south—easterly wind coming, so the one degree in manchester in the wind will feel more like —a against your skin. wherever you are in the uk it will feel colder than you might see on the thermometer. and then as we heading to friday, the nagging south—easterly coming off the cold continent, dry weather around at a set of fronts waiting in the wings in the atlantic. they will come in from the south—west bringing rain and note the temperatures lifting. and as we go through the
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rest of the day and into the weekend it will be less chilly. i have a special treat tonight, i am going to see you in person. it will be lovely. and it is burns night as well is the national tv awards. she is going to be fired up. it is and we are nominated and as we has said before we are quite excited. yes, fully dressed and ready to go. and i know we are not allowed to be plucky, but you can vote at midday, —— from mendez, and there are other categories —— from midday. —— from mendez, and there are other categories -- from midday. we are in the life magazine show. it is over now. it will be over by tomorrow. its plastic bricks are commonplace in playrooms all over the world, turning it into the most profitable toy business of all, what is it? lego. yes. lego is having a problem with counterfeits. and we have a great report that i
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will show you in a second. the boss can't tell the fake from the real ones. you'll be used to seeing fake ray ban glasses and rip off designer handbags at the beach but what about fake toys? lego is the biggest toy maker in the world and the danish firm is trying to make it big in china, too. they've just opened a factory there, taking on thousands of new staff. but the problem with rip offs is so great they're already suing one chinese manufacturer, and the world's biggest retailer alibaba has taken down tens of thousands of online links to suspect lego products in the last year alone. my colleague in asia robin brant went to meet the boss. billions and billions of these little plastic bricks have been sold the world over and now lego is betting big on china. what started out with hand—cut bricks in denmark in 19a9 is now a $100 million state—of—the—art operation near shanghai but they are not the only ones doing it. copies like this and fakes
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or counterfeits are prolific in china. lego is currently suing the firm behind this copycat star wnrs model. so how easy is it to spot the difference? we bought a real one and a copycat and asked the experts. if you have to ask me to guess, i would say this one, maybe. which one do you think is a real? you think this one is real. you're right. correct. the truth is, they look and feel almost identical. the copy‘s so good, in fact, that even the boss of that huge new lego factory can't tell. have a little look at that for me. what do you think of that? it looks like a mini figure to me.
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what do you think of him? two men. which one's yours? just have a guess for me. i would say this is lego and this is not. 0k. this is lego. no, this is lego. bought from toy‘r'us yesterday, built by my daughter. that's not real. it's not lego. it is trying to be lego, is my assessment of it. lego is not the only foreign firm investing big in china but having trouble with local copycats. land rovers are now made here. white evoques like this sell particulalrly well. but the british firm has been powerless to stop this. tucked away on a shanghai side street, this is a land wind. it's similar on the inside and very, very similar on the outside but a lot cheaper. this is our copycat that caught people out. you can buy him and the real thing on the huge online retailer,
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alibaba. they took down thousands of links to copycat lego products last year alone but the toy maker is still pursuing manufacturers in the courts because even the boss cannot tell the difference. robin brant, bbc news, shanghai. fascinating, isn't it? with me now is intellectual property expert charlotte wigham. charlotte, good morning. so, that report is fascinating and we saw the boss couldn't spot the difference between the figures, but noticeably the kids could, so they know what they are doing, butjust talk through the problem, what laws have been breached, what is the problem as far as lego is concerned? yes, there are various potential breaches of intellectual property rights here. and you know, a company like lego, iam here. and you know, a company like lego, i am not surprised that they wa nt to lego, i am not surprised that they want to pursue that. intellectual property rights can exist in things
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like the logo, which is trademarked, design, the packaging, the figurines themselves might be trademarked or themselves might be trademarked or the artistic works, the instructions, all kinds of intellectual property rights that could have been infringed. so many interesting things, there was a grey area, it is about whether it is trying to be pretending to be something, or if it is distinctively different, and with china that is the problem, many see it as the wild west with many of the traditional rules we take for granted in europe or the us don't seem to apply. yes, well, one issue is the likelihood of confusion. with counterfeit goods sometimes providing them knowing they are counterfeit, so there are two things going on. yes, in general, china has traditionally
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been seen in that light, u nfortu nately, been seen in that light, unfortunately, as the largest manufacturer. but things are changing. we are seeing a lot more cases being brought in china against those infringing. the chinese government has committed to improving its legal system and its enforcement of those intellectual property rights, which is very positive. some change there. it comes down to two things. all the companies creating these things, it costs m o ney companies creating these things, it costs money on research and development, but if you are a consumer and you have the choice, one might be £5 and the other is £10, you may be tempted to choose the cheaper one? yes, i can understand why people buy counterfeit goods. of course, for the price reason. but there are various considerations. obviously, as an intellectual property lawyer, thatis as an intellectual property lawyer, that is my livelihood, and it is obviously important. there are also
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serious issues for consumers, safety regulations won't have been complied with usually with counterfeit goods, which is important with lego. it is a toy, you don't know what is in the product, and then there are other consumer protection issues, if you are buying counterfeit goods online, giving out your bank details to god knows her, so there are various reasons why you would discourage it. it is really fascinating, such an interesting area, so, there you go and that is fake. oh, it has come apart, actually. all sorts of reasons. thank you. there is humour in everything, he knows his stuff. coming up on breakfast: if you think you know your british history, then think again. historian lucy worsley will be here to separate fact from fiction, and what she says are our nation's biggest fibs. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm alice salfield. several businesses have been destroyed after a large fire gutted a building on an industrial estate in wembley. over 120 fire—fighters tackled the blaze, which began on monday evening but wasn't brought under control until tuesday afternoon. an investigation has begun into the cause of the fire. lewisham council will hold an independent review into controversial plans to redevelop land around millwall's football stadium. bbc london has seen a letter from the council's chief executive saying recent newspaper reports about the funding of a sports trust which is at the heart of the plans and will be reviewed externally. if the development goes ahead, millwall have suggested it could force them to leave the area. a protest camp at leith hill
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in surrey will be removed, after a decision was made by the high court. they're protesting europa's plans to create a test drilling well in the area of natural beauty. the company believes that a substantial reservoir of oil could exist beneath the surrey hills. it's expected the campaigners will be evicted within the next few days. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good news if you're using the tubes this morning as all lines look like they're running well at the moment. butjust a warning that from 9pm tonight tube drivers on the central and waterloo & city lines will walk out for 2a—hours. on the trains, southeastern still has various diversions in place after a freight train derailed yesterday. make sure you check their website for information about yourjourney. we have the usual buildup on the roads on the blackwall tunnel. there was a collision involving six
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ca rs there was a collision involving six cars on the mao atjunction a. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another cold and foggy start to the day. now, the fog quite extensive in places. we didn't get it yesterday, so some thick, freezing fog and it's feeling cold. so the met office has issued a weather warning for the dense, potentially freezing fog, but also for the ice risk as well. through the course of the morning, we have cloud moving in through the continent. that will help to eat the cloud away. the air underneath the cloud much colder, it's going to feel very chilly this afternoon. the maximum temperature struggling between 1—a degrees. overnight tonight, another very cold one, widespread frost, temperatures dropping down. still a little bit of mist and fog but a bit more of a breeze helping to keep it moving. the minimum temperature between 0 and —1 in towns and cities, so a very cold day tomorrow, taht air still very chilly air from the near continent. on friday, similar conditions. through the weekend we have this area of low pressure, which spins some showers across us through much of saturday. if you're looking for a better day of the two, sunday's your best bet for the moment, so for the next couple of days, for tomorrow,
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a very cold day, the air coming in from the continent, temperatures only in single figures, two or three at best. a chilly night into friday but some slightly less cold air as we head into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the government prepares to put its plan for brexit before the commons. yesterdayjudges ruled that mps should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. it's thought a bill could now be introduced as early as tomorrow. i will be live at westminster where ministers are warning mps not to try to thwart the will of the people, but mps are looking for more
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information and a greater say on the brexit process. good morning. it's wednesday 25th january. also this morning: president trump promises a "big day" ahead on national security including an announcement about his plans for a wall on the mexican border. cana company impose a dress code for staff? from high heels to short skirts — two parliamentary reports say no. firms must not and cannot tell workers what to wear. johanna konta has been knocked out the australian open. she lost her quarter—final to serena williams 6—2, 6—3 injust over an hour in melbourne. she was the last brit left in the competition. also this morning, a toy story with a difference. which one is yours? this is lego.
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this is not. ok, this is lego. no, this is lego. we'll find out how one of the world's best known brands is counting the cost of counterfeiting in china. and carol has the weather. good morning. once again we've got freezing fog especially so across parts of england and east wales. there is ice to watch out for first thing, but some of us will see sunshine, some of us will see a little drop of rain and it will be windy in the north—west. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. mps have increased pressure on theresa may to set out her negotiating position on brexit. the demands for a white paper, including from some conservatives, follow yesterday's supreme court ruling. the prime minister must now give parliament a vote before triggering article 50, the formal process for leaving the eu. it's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. after thejudges ruled only
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parliament can start brexit, today a warning for mps — don't try to derail the plan. the supreme courtjudgement means a bill on triggering article 50, the start of britain's exit process, must be put before mps and lords. so what lies on the road ahead? the government says legislation paving the way for brexit will be tabled within days. that'll be voted on by both houses of parliament. theresa may wants article 50 triggered by the end of march. then britain has two years to leave the eu. so there can be no going back. the point of no return was passed on 23rd june last year. labour say they won't block article 50, but want to amend the bill to give mps more control of the process. if necessary, there will be hand—to—hand combat on this. we need to make sure that we get the best deal on behalf of the whole country and she can't say she acts on behalf of the whole country. theresa may also faces opposition
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from some of her own mps who want a formal exit document to be debated, but for now at least, ministers believe they are on track to get brexit triggered by the spring. our political correspondent carole walker is outside the houses of parliament. i wanted to show you this cartoon on the front of the telegraph. it says, "from the supreme court ruling it means i will be standing outside parliament for the next few months." you can see it zwrust about there. and let's talk about that tory rebellion. just how big a rebellion might that be? well, i think there is plenty in the brexit process to keep me out here for many yea rs process to keep me out here for many years to come yet! but when it comes to the bill ta we're going to get introduced into the commons tomorrow, we're told by ministers that they want that to be straightforward and brief and they wa nt to
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straightforward and brief and they want to get it through as soon as possible. n—terms of a conservative rebellion —— in terms of a conservative rebellion, there are some conservatives who might possibly side with the opposition parties in seeking in what they're calling a white paper. it is a formal document setting out the government's plans, but that's something the government could agree to without too much difficulty. there are other demands on the government. labour are saying that they want any vote on a deal to be meaningful so they could force the prime minister to go back and negotiate a better deal if parliament doesn't like what she gets. the snp are saying that scotla nd gets. the snp are saying that scotland should be allowed to stay in the single market. so, i think, there will be a lot of efforts to try to amend and to try and change this bill as it goes through parliament, but as things stand, ministers are still pretty confident that they can stick to their timetable, trigger article 50 to start the formal brexit negotiations by the end of march. thank you,
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carole. i expect to speak to you for many more days standing exactly where you are. we'll be speaking to the businesswoman gina miller in a few minutes time. president trump has said a "big day" is planned on national security today, including an announcement on building a wall on the us border with mexico, one of his main campaign pledges. in a message on twitter, he also said to expect "many other things". reports from washington say he will sign several executive orders relating to immigration and border security over the coming days. here's our correspondent, david willis. we're going to have our borders nice and strong. we're going to build a wall. we're going to build the wall... it was the soundtrack to donald trump's unorthodox campaign for president, a call to build a wall along america's southern border with mexico. now he seems set to press ahead with measures he believes are vital to stemming the illegal flow of immigrants into the united states.
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the president on his twitter account said simply, "big day planned on national security tomorrow among many other things. we will build the wall." he's vowed to make mexico pay for it what's more, although the mexican government has refused to do so. later in the week, to round off a busy start to his presidency, mr trump is expected to sign executive orders, closing america's borders to refugees and limiting access to citizens from seven african and middle eastern countries, countries the administration believes export terrorism. they're mainly muslim countries but the mantra of the trump administration is america first. a country that traditionally has opened its doors to immigrants is about to head in the opposite direction. women in the workplace are being told what to wear, how to have their hair and how much make up they need to put on, according to a commons report into office discrimination. mps began an inquiry
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after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. they heard examples of sexism from hundreds of women, as our business correspondent emma simpson explains. what to wear at work? sometimes there's no choice, and it's not always attractive. but what about being ordered to wear high heels? when nicola thorp arrived for her first day at work, she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes with a two to four inch heel. when she refused, she was sent home without pay. what they state is it gives them a more professional look. a corporate, professional look. now i'm not entirely sure why adding two or four inches to my height makes me more professional or makes me walk in a professional manner. i don't think it affects how i come across. you can see me now, this is exactly what i would be wearing and if it's just a matter of a couple of inches, i can stand tall without wearing heels. she then started a petition, which led to an inquiry by mps, who now want action from the government.
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we've come up with three recommendations. firstly, that the equalities act of 2010 obviously isn't quite addressing that bit. secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make—up may be a health and safety issue in the workplace. thirdly, we are going to hopefully... if it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court. there'll be tribunals. at this company, receptionists can wear what they like. in its evidence, the government said the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed on nicola was unlawful. but the mps are calling on the government to do more to make the law more effective in protecting employees from discrimination at work. david cameron has been appointed president of alzheimer's research uk. in an article in the times, he says research into cancer and stroke deserve all their funding, but that dementia shouldn't
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be so far behind. his new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing down as an mp. a rnli lifeboat station in yorkshire has a new crew member, basil, the fox. the wild animal has befriended the team and has become a regular visitor to the station. they say he's nearly as tame as a pet dog and as you can see, he certainly isn't camera shy! he's nice, isn't he? we've got carol coming up. the new wales captain will be talking to sally after 8.30am. her photograph is in all the pictures, it is gina miller. declaring yesterday's winning as a vic ve for the constitution. gina millerjoins us now. thank you very much forjoining us.
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i'm wondering how you feel today. you took this to the supreme court, was it the right thing to do?m you took this to the supreme court, was it the right thing to do? it was the right thing. if it was clear cut as to who had the power to trigger article 50, the courts wouldn't have accepted the case and we wouldn't have gone all the way up to the supreme court. how do you feel? you've got your way. it went your way in the end. how do you feel about that today? i'm delighted the debate has already started and the mps are already doing what they should have done, ifelt, months ago, and before the actual vote itself. so i'm delighted that they have already started their debate. in some ways it was more about the debate for you, was it? oh, absolutely. this is what the mps we re absolutely. this is what the mps were supposed to do. they're supposed to debate vote, put through an act of parliament and then the government can trigger article 50. we've heard from david davis saying he hopes that parliament and this won't be used to thwart the will of
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the people. what's your reaction to people who say that perhaps that's what you have been trying to do? we need to move on. it is a broken record. we can't go back and talk about what happened lastjune. we need to look forward and what's going to happen in the future. we haven't talked about that. my case was to ensure that our constitution stands and that governments can actually ensure that they are a nswera ble to actually ensure that they are answerable to parliament. in some ways, it was 8—3, wasn't it, amongst the justices and we heard from one of the three that voted against this, lord reid, he was cautioning against judicial activism. this, lord reid, he was cautioning againstjudicialactivism. he this, lord reid, he was cautioning againstjudicial activism. he said the courts should not overlook the constitutional importance of ministerial accountability to parliament. and what do you think about this, is this involvement of the judiciary about this, is this involvement of thejudiciary in about this, is this involvement of the judiciary in politics? the judges did not in anyway involve themselves in politics. they looked at the rule of law. they looked at our constitutional law. they were very careful and to have independent
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judges who can hold the government and ministers to account is exactly theirjob. do you think it will, i mean, now we are going to see this debate and we know as well because we've spoken to people here on bbc brea kfast, we've spoken to people here on bbc breakfast, there will be different votes along the way. the government is maintaining until not change the timetable, what are your thoughts? no, i don't see how it would change the timetable in that they can have emergency sittings etcetera, but i'd like to point out that if the government actually hadn't done the appeal in october they wouldn't be in this position of having to rush everything through. it was them who decided to appeal, not us, obviously because we won. so you have to ask the government as to why they appealed. just let's talk as well, because i know, that you have received and many of these have been passed on to police, abuse as well. tell me about the personal cost. tell me about the personal cost. tell me about the personal cost. tell me about the tone of what's been going on for you? well, it has at times been very difficult, but
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i've had to push it to the side. i can't allow others to win by bullying me. what i have decided to dojust be bullying me. what i have decided to do just be steely and focus on why i do just be steely and focus on why i do things. i know the principles and the reasons behind behind what i've done and i won't let them win. what ifind done and i won't let them win. what i find shocking is the amount of bullying of women that i've come across as i've more into the public eye from people like yourself doing theirjobs in the media, and journalists etcetera, you know, we have to get away from this idea that just because you're doing yourjob, just because you're doing yourjob, just because you're standing up and putting yourself out there for things you believe are right, it is justified that you can be targeted by the most vile behaviour. we have to stand up to this. and we all have to stand up to this. and we all have to stand up to this. and we all have to stand up to it as you say, give a little bit about the tone of what you've had. it must have an impact on you in some ways? you're trying to do yourjob and this is what's coming at you. well, at times it's difficult because nobody is looking at the message of what i'm doing, it
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is very, very personal, it is assassination, be it about my gender or my country of origin, it is so personal, when did we get to this place? it can't be like this and i won't let them win, but i have to say, it is disheartening, hugely disheartening that it has been so vile. 0k, vile. ok, what happens to you now? you have been through this extraordinary battle. it has been to the supreme court, what next? i will go back to doing what i do in my dayjob, i'm very active when it comes to the city and the rip office and the charity sector and running my business, i will go back to doing all the things i was doing before. gene gernings thank you for your time here oon breakfast, thank you. for many of you, this is the final weather bulletin you watch before going out today. what can people expect? peter lawell. jobs to get through,
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schools together two. —— people have gotjobs to get to. in the south—east and the midlands, freezing fog. it may lead to some travel disruption. you can find out what is happening on your bbc local radio station. the fact it is freezing fog tells you something about the temperatures. watch out for slippery surfaces. roads and pavements alike. fog in east anglia, pa rt pavements alike. fog in east anglia, part of the midlands, heading down towards southern counties. it is patchy but it is dense. on a par with what we had on monday. mild in the south—west. some sunshine. patchy fog in the welsh marches. generally speaking, much of wales is fog free. fog patches across the vale of york. the rest of northern england is fine but cold. a cloudy
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start in scotland and northern ireland. also windy. today the winds touching gale force. especially in the north—west. as for the fog, as we import cloud from —— fog from the low continent, the fog will lift into low cloud. the midlands and northern england, perhaps it will ta ke northern england, perhaps it will take into the early part of the afternoon. it will feel cold under this fog. sunshine tour south—west england, wales, the north west midlands and the moray firth. tonight, a lotto windy conditions towards the west. breezy across the rest of the uk. although fog will not be too much of an issue, we're looking at a widespread frost. there will be some drizzle in the morning. some will see the odd snow flurry. that is how we start tomorrow, on
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this cold note. tomorrow, dry weather. the odd snow flurry, drizzle. the wind is coming from the cold continent. temperature wise, although we're looking at values into low single figures, it will feel colder than that if you are in the wind. friday, still under this cold wind, a love of dry weather. atla ntic cold wind, a love of dry weather. atlantic france from the west will introduce rain and milder air. —— atla ntic introduce rain and milder air. —— atlantic fronts. sunday is going to be the best day weather—wise. thank you. in the last few minutes, we've had a couple of christmas updates from the high street. ben's got the latest. still talking about christmas. such a big time for the retailers. and now we get a sense of who the winners and losers are. good morning. wh smith says like—for—like sales rose 5% boosted by its stores at train stations and airports. but it's a familiar tale on the high street, where sales fell again,
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this time, by 3%. spanish bank santander says its profit in the uk was down by almost 1596. profit in the uk was down by almost 15%. that is mainly due to the fall in the value of the pound after the brexit ford. a better performance in south america helped to improve the british figures. profits were up just over a%. £8 billion was wiped off the value of bt yesterday. its shares slumped by 20% because of in —— accounting scandal in italy. problems with bt‘s italian business were found to be much worse than first thought, including misreporting profits and borrowing money to pay debts. bt has fired its italian management team, but british boss gavin patterson will face questions over how the problems occurred in the first place. you are right up—to—date.
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dress code, an interesting issue. having to wear high heels, make—up, shorter skirts or even dying their hair — those are just some examples of what women say they have been asked to do for theirjob. now mps are calling on the government to take action against discriminatory dress codes. let's take a look at some of the stories they were told. one air hostess described feeling humiliated due to company uniform policy, adding that there was one set of clothing rules for men, and a different one for women. another woman working in a jewellery store said wearing high heels caused her serious pain. while a retail worker told mps she was offended by company dress rules, which she said attracted unwanted attention from customers. for more on this, let's talk to nicola thorp, who launched the petition to parliament after her experience of dress code discrimination. she's in central london. and we're alsojoined by ann francke, chief executive of the chartered management institute, which promotes best practice in business leadership. nicola, can you run bus through what
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exactly happened to you and what was the process he went through? last year, i turned for my first day as a receptionist at an accountancy firm in london. i turned up in the usual uniform, issued and smart flat shoes. i was told it was company policy that i have to wear high heels for the day's work. i refused, soi heels for the day's work. i refused, so i was sent home. they wanted you to go out and buy these issues? yes, they said the only way i could work that day was with fight went out and bought a that day was with fight went out and boughta pairof that day was with fight went out and bought a pair of shoes. —— if i went out. i was sent home. wide did they think you had to wear high heels, because of the impression they felt you should be giving? that's what they said. they said it was an
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industrywide practice. i saw women working higher up in the accountancy firm wearing flat shoes. i said, it's obviously not for everybody in this company at a higher level, so why are you asking us to wear them? ‘s turned out because the agency i had worked for, insisted that all girls wore flat, sorry, high heel shoes and magog. a items of magog. —— make—ups. isuggested shoes and magog. a items of magog. —— make—ups. i suggested the dress code was sexist. i was laughed out of the building. right. and, she is not alone. you have looked at this sort of thing. what have you been finding? what we found is that gender discrimination is still widespread. four out of five managers have experienced it in the workplace in the last year. there are the dress code examples, equally there are inappropriate remarks,
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interrupting me to —— women at meetings and a lack of promotion and unequal pay. quite a lot to be done still. a lot of people get involved in this as well. they are contacting the programme. wendy, i may be old school but dress code should apply. they don't need to be sexist but create a better attitude. there can bea create a better attitude. there can be a dress code across the sexes. create a better attitude. there can be a dress code across the sexeslj agree that dress codes are important for business. they puff —— project a professional image. but in my case and that of thousands of other women, they were being told they needed to look attractive to do theirjob. their male counterparts we re theirjob. their male counterparts were not being told the same thing. things have changed with regard to companies. what you think needs to change? how do attitudes change?
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absolutely it is a cultural issue. we think that men need to become more involved as role models. we know the majority of men support gender equality in the workplace. 80% to support this. what we want is for men and women to call out these bad examples, be they of behaviour, dress codes, like a promotional opportunity. and we want companies to follow best practice. we do have a website where you can go and look and see what others are doing to tackle this issue. nicola, what do you feel about the publicity your case has attracted and the fact we are talking about it here? summary people seem to have a view. are talking about it here? summary people seem to have a viewm are talking about it here? summary people seem to have a view. it is fantastic. hundreds of women have, ride the woodwork and said, this has happened to me. i didn't feel like i could bring it up at work. a lot of
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these women are on zero hours contracts or are temporary workers. even women and contracts were scared of losing their livelihoods. the current structure, legally, benefits the employers because the penalty isn't big enough to scare them into following dress code laws. what they do is they say to women, you have to do is they say to women, you have to do this, you have to wear that, because the likelihood of women —— woman painter take that employer to a tribunal is very low. they get away with it. —— and woman paying to ta ke away with it. —— and woman paying to take that employer to a tribunal. let's pick—up on that point about calling out. that is uncomfortable, isn't it? it is an uncomfortable place but i would encourage people to come forward as nicola has done because that is how we will change the culture, when people see it is no longer acceptable to behave that way. a gender balanced workplace is
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a better workplace. it is more productive, it is happier. there are very good commercial reasons for ending discrimination. let me read some more texts. sanders says she has to wear white shirt and a tie serving food in a busy environment. it will be a nightmare in the summer when it is hot. trudy says, surely it is more about not sexualising dress, asking staff to be smart is not the same as asking a woman to wear high heels and lipstick. would you expect a man to wear something that draws attention to their bodies? that's the point. it can't be discriminatory. it is fine if you are ina be discriminatory. it is fine if you are in a hairdressers and you have to wear all black because you want to wear all black because you want to project a cool image. 0r to wear all black because you want to project a cool image. or if you are serving food and the uniform is white with a black tie. but
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sexualising women is wrong. do you think things are changing? absolutely. after the petition and the media coverage, i'm grateful that people are debating this. hopefully now employers will think twice. thank you. now the news where you are. good morning. huge contrasts across the uk this morning. the fog is freezing in places. it is dense. really poor visibility and some travel disruption is likely. that's where the worst of the fog is parts of the midlands and east anglia and the south east. slow to clear. just lifting up into low cloud. a grey and cold day here. a good swathe of sunshine through wales and up into northern england. most places will be dry. a bit of patchy rain this afternoon into the western isles. ten or 11 celsius here. some places only three orfour ten or 11 celsius here. some places only three or four celsius. overnight, we have got they breeze
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coming in from the south—west. a fair bit of cloud, yes, but not much in the way of rain. there maybe a few fla kes in the way of rain. there maybe a few flakes of snow here and there. thursday will be a cold day. we've got they south easterly wind. it's dragging in some really cold air from the near continent. we heard how cold it has been across europe and the cold air is heading our way. it will bring a significant wind—chill factor. it will feel cold through the day on thursday. a grey start. there will be a little bit of snow here and there, but it won't amount to very much. a lot of cloud and many places will be dry. the best of the bright weather across the north of scotland. there will be sunny spells developing further south. temperatures at best around about four or five celsius, but when you factor in the wind, many places will feel it is around about freezing or a good few degrees below. towards the end of the week, we have got that south easterly wind. we are seeing something wetter
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coming in from the atlantic. a change in the script for northern ireland and the west of the uk. it will be dry, but it will feel cold. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and sally bundock. as president trump tells car makers to build more vehicles in the usa, mexico tries to keep the border open for business. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 25th january. mexico's foreign and economy ministers head to washington, but will it be the realities of modern manufacturing that make the biggest difference? also in the programme, the lowdown on lego. it's one of the world's most successful toys, but with china rife with copycats, can the boss tell the difference? the european
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